Should political ads be banned on social media?

Twitter is banning all political advertising around the world from next month. Social media has transformed the way we debate politics. Donald Trump, the president of the United States, often uses Twitter to announce new policies, attack an opponent or even re-tweet what many consider to be misleading information. Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have been criticised for allowing political hate speech and misinformation to flourish on their platforms. Now, with just a year to go before the US presidential election, Twitter is banning all political advertising around the world from…

Read More

What you should know if your smart TV makes you feel dumb

If it seems as though televisions have gotten very complicated very fast, it’s not just you. Sometimes smart technology can make us feel, well, dumb. You must contend with a number of abbreviations — LCD, OLED, HDR, HDMI and more — and widely varying price points. What does it all mean, and why can’t we just go buy a TV? To break it down, we talked to technology experts, a deals guru and an interior design expert — because you shouldn’t need a degree in TV to binge-watch “Stranger Things.”…

Read More

Zuckerberg: ‘Fifth estate’ should not decide what is credible

Facebook CEO says social media companies ought not be responsible for judging the merits of political expression. Facebook Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg said the social network doesn’t fact-check political advertisements because it’s not the place of technology companies to become arbiters of truth. “I don’t think most people want to live in a world where you can only post things that tech companies judge to be 100% true,” Zuckerberg said on Thursday to an auditorium full of students at Georgetown University’s Gaston Hall in Washington. “People should be…

Read More

Should businesses put social impact above profit?

Corporate titans, including CEOs of Amazon and JPMorgan, say that shareholders’ interests should not be top priority. The mantra “the shareholder comes first” has long been the governing ethos of the Business Roundtable, a group that represents the most powerful chief executive officers in the United States. But a new document about the role of corporations that was published on Monday advocates a foundational shift, putting shareholders on more equal footing with other stakeholders who share an interest in the same company: workers, consumers, and ultimately, society as a whole.…

Read More